Laura Jane Atelier

Scarlett O’Hara’s Favorite Beauty Products

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

Hello lovelies, I am a huge fan of the film Gone With The Wind and thought it would be fun if I did a video discussing Scarlett O’Hara’s favorite beauty products. 

Scarlett O’Hara is a fictional character and the protagonist in Margaret Mitchell’s 1936 novel Gone with the Wind and in the later film of the same name, where Vivien Leigh portrays her.

O’Hara is the oldest living child of Gerald and Ellen O’Hara. She was born in 1844 or 1845 on her family’s plantation Tara in Georgia. O’Hara has black hair, green eyes, and pale skin. She is famous for her fashionably small waist. Scarlett’s simultaneous desire for the Southern gentleman Ashley and the opportunistic New Southerner Rhett Butler parallels the South’s struggle to cling to tradition and still survive in the new era.

Florida Water:

There are many scenes in the film showing Scarlette O’Hara using Florida Water. Introduced in 1808, Florida Water was an established commodity in American perfumery shops as early as the 1830s and was considered a drugstore staple by the 1850s. Although a generic product, it came to be typified by the original and oft-imitated company of Robert J. Murray and David T.

This flowery description, taken from the back of an 1880 trade card for Murray and Lanman’s Florida Water, details the plethora of uses their product offers. Today, their site claims that the product’s sustained success is due not only to its “delightful fragrance” as a perfume but also the “more than twenty uses attributed to it.” An “Americanized” eau de cologne, Florida Water’s base ingredient is alcohol, in which essential oils are dissolved. Historically, lavender has always been the main scent, but bergamot, lemon, orange, and a variety of others could all be added to achieve a particular fragrance.

Both men and women would apply Florida Water to their skin and clothing, drink it, spray it in the air to prevent infection, use it as aftershave, fill their bathtubs with it, and more. With so many uses, Florida Water was an indispensable product for any nineteenth-century home. Its multi-faceted nature gave the product adaptability necessary for sustaining demand. Florida Water tapped into centuries-old traditions in which manufactured scented spirits were not distinguished from natural medicinal waters. A fourteenth-century legend, for example, held that Hungary Water (of similar qualities) restored the maidenly beauty of the Hungarian Queen.

19TH CENTURY AMERICAN COSMETICS

In America during the 19th century, the use of cosmetics declined. The elderly used them to conceal the marks of age. More soap was used than creams. A combination of land rose water, and coconut milk made a popular hand lotion. Men decided that cosmetics were effeminate and eliminated all cosmetics except hair-dressing. During the Civil War, northern profiteers started the expensive habit of powdering their hair with gold and silver dust. In 1866, it was discovered that zinc oxide could provide an excellent base for face powder. It was safe, held its color, and was low-priced. Between 1880 and 1900, only the least bit of cosmetics was fashionable. The mark of a true lady was her natural, untouched appearance.

1857 Civil War Cucumber Cold Cream 

Today many think that Civil War women didn’t wear cosmetics. While that belief is highly regarded as fact, in truth, when you look at cosmetics use thought history, the 1850-1860s were more focused on a natural look, but that doesn’t mean cosmetics didn’t exist and general women didn’t wear them. On the contrary, cosmetics were worn, which gave the skin a natural healthy glow as well as slight blushing of cheeks and lips. So rouges that gave just a hint of blush were worn.

Cold Creams were used as a moisturizer and to take off the slightest bit of rouge. They protect the skin, making it supple, smooth, and healthy. Cucumber and Neroli products were very popular at this time. This Authentic recipe uses both Cucumber and Neroli to give a lovely fresh scent. A little goes a long way, apply it before bed or in the morning. Use it to clean your face from dirt or cosmetics.

Herbal Toner 1772 Astringent 

This recipe works naturally to diminish and remove spots and marks. 

The main ingredients- Borage and Rose. These both are amazing for the diminishing marks and smoothing out your complexion. Besides, it also helps to prevent water loss and helps to keep the skin moist. It will treat dry skin, sunburn, and other skin problems. It is also said to combat aging. This formula works wonders on Age Marks and Sun Marks. This original 18th-century recipe doesn’t have any chemicals in so unlike today’s beauty products, and the process will take longer. Still, because it is done naturally, it will not only rejuvenate your skin but also firm and fight against the appearance of more unwanted spots.

Pink/ Coral Historical Rouge 

Scarlette O’Hara had beautiful peach cheeks and wore this pink historical rouge. 

1822 Cream Of Roses Rose Absolute Cold Cream 

This was the first time in history that the term “Cosmetics” actually separated into a separate category -from cosmetics being medicinal. This was a considerable change in the makeup/ cosmetics industry. The reason behind it was a result of the continued inoculations and education of smallpox. Makeup wasn’t needed anymore in bulk -to hide scaring and such. 

Now women could focus on facial care starting at the base- that was the big push. Taking care of the skin became an essential step in a ladies’ regime. This is why you started to see so many various products like “cream of roses” or numerous astringents and face washes. The shelves were filled with skincare products. Of course, makeup and cosmetics were still available and able to be used. The amount applied varied throughout the regency time frame. 

Cream of Roses was a staple on every woman’s toilette. It was essential for soft glowing, youthful skin, and Cold Creams were a product regularly used up until the 1960s.

A Lily Pomatum For Wrinkles 1772 

This recipe was titled, “A Pomatum for Wrinkles” It called for the juice of white lily roots, honey, white wax and made a pomatum from them. Lily has been used throughout history in skincare regiments of the wealthy.

Lily Oil is excellent for those with sensitive skin, and It has been proven to help treat wrinkles, dry skin, spider veins, It is also recommended for use under the eye, treating burns and preventing the formation of scar tissue. Essential lily oil is used in aromatherapy to treat individuals suffering from depression and tends to help in creating a feeling of modesty, happiness, and a sense of security.

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

Scarlett O'Hara's Favorite Beauty products, LCBB Apothecary, 19th century beauty products, civil beauty products, Florida water, gone with the wind florida water, gone with the wind beauty prodcuts, Vivien Leigh

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